fbpx
Loading Events

« All Events

The Future of Water: A Call to Action to Avert a Global Climate Crisis

Details

October 19
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm EDT
Add to Calendar October 19 6:00 pm October 19 7:00 pm America/New_York The Future of Water: A Call to Action to Avert a Global Climate Crisis

At the heart of climate consequences — from heat and fire to flooding and sea level rise — is water. Our lives and societies depend on water to survive, yet, at this time of unprecedented climate change, water-related risks are multiplying.

On Wednesday, October 19, 2022, we invite you to join an important discussion about the future of water, how to protect this precious resource, ensure access to clean drinking water, and how to avert catastrophic flooding and seawater inundation.

Columbia Climate School Founding Dean Alex Halliday will moderate a live, virtual Zoom discussion with three of the University’s leading researchers in water security and the risk to global water supplies.

The Future of Water: A Call to Action to Avert a Global Climate Crisis with Upmanu Lall, Director of the Columbia Water Center; Ana Navas-Acien MD, Professor and Vice-Chair of Research at the Columbia Department of Environmental Health Sciences; and Ngai Yin Yip, Assistant Professor of Earth and Environmental Engineering, and hosted by Dr. Halliday will feature leading-edge research on our world of water.

We invite you to bring your questions to this illuminating session.

The Speakers:

Upmanu Lall is the Director of the Columbia Water Center and the Alan and Carol Silberstein Professor of Engineering at Columbia University. He is a world-renowned expert in statistical and numerical modeling of hydrologic and climatic systems and water resource systems planning and management. He has pioneered statistical methods and their application to the prediction of hydrologic and climate conditions, and advanced tools for decision analysis and risk management.

Ana Navas-Acien Professor of Environmental Health Sciences and Director, Columbia University Superfund Research Program. Ana is a physician-epidemiologist (MD, University of Granada, Spain ’96) with a specialty in Preventive Medicine and Public Health (Hospital La Paz, Madrid ’01) and a PhD in Epidemiology (Johns Hopkins University ’05). Her research investigates the long-term health effects of environmental exposures (arsenic and other metals, tobacco smoke, e-cigarettes, air pollution), their interactions with genetic and epigenetic variants, and effective interventions for reducing involuntary exposures. She collaborates with major cohort studies such as the Strong Heart Study, a study of cardiovascular disease and its risk factors in American Indian communities, and the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), a study of cardiovascular, metabolic and lung disease in urban settings across the US. Both in the US and internationally, she evaluates exposure to tobacco smoke including emerging public health challenges such as waterpipe smoking and e-cigarettes. Her goals are to contribute to the reduction of environmental health disparities in underserved and disproportionately exposed populations.

Ngai Yin Yip is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Earth and Environmental Engineering at Columbia University. Ngai Yin Yip and his research team are advancing technologies to address challenges at the nexus of water, energy, and the environment. The lab is currently developing new materials and methods for energy efficient desalination, investigating a novel membrane-based technique to harness low-grade heat, and exploring innovative physicochemical strategies for resource recovery from waste streams.

The Moderator:

Alex Halliday is the Founding Dean of the Columbia Climate School and Director of Columbia University’s Earth Institute. He joined the Earth Institute in April 2018, after spending more than a decade at the University of Oxford, during which time he was Dean of Science and Engineering. With about 400 published research papers, Halliday has been a pioneer in developing mass spectrometry to measure small isotopic variations, helping to shed light on the birth and early development of our solar system, the interior workings of the Earth, and the processes that affect Earth’s surface environment.

About Us:

The climate crisis is a challenge like no other. Tackling it requires innovative, coordinated, and transdisciplinary approaches from a top university, like Columbia. The Climate School will marshal the University’s strengths in basic disciplines and expand its resources to understand climate and its impact on society.

Location of the event
Issues:

Organizer

Columbia Climate School

At the heart of climate consequences — from heat and fire to flooding and sea level rise — is water. Our lives and societies depend on water to survive, yet, at this time of unprecedented climate change, water-related risks are multiplying.

On Wednesday, October 19, 2022, we invite you to join an important discussion about the future of water, how to protect this precious resource, ensure access to clean drinking water, and how to avert catastrophic flooding and seawater inundation.

Columbia Climate School Founding Dean Alex Halliday will moderate a live, virtual Zoom discussion with three of the University’s leading researchers in water security and the risk to global water supplies.

The Future of Water: A Call to Action to Avert a Global Climate Crisis with Upmanu Lall, Director of the Columbia Water Center; Ana Navas-Acien MD, Professor and Vice-Chair of Research at the Columbia Department of Environmental Health Sciences; and Ngai Yin Yip, Assistant Professor of Earth and Environmental Engineering, and hosted by Dr. Halliday will feature leading-edge research on our world of water.

We invite you to bring your questions to this illuminating session.

The Speakers:

Upmanu Lall is the Director of the Columbia Water Center and the Alan and Carol Silberstein Professor of Engineering at Columbia University. He is a world-renowned expert in statistical and numerical modeling of hydrologic and climatic systems and water resource systems planning and management. He has pioneered statistical methods and their application to the prediction of hydrologic and climate conditions, and advanced tools for decision analysis and risk management.

Ana Navas-Acien Professor of Environmental Health Sciences and Director, Columbia University Superfund Research Program. Ana is a physician-epidemiologist (MD, University of Granada, Spain ’96) with a specialty in Preventive Medicine and Public Health (Hospital La Paz, Madrid ’01) and a PhD in Epidemiology (Johns Hopkins University ’05). Her research investigates the long-term health effects of environmental exposures (arsenic and other metals, tobacco smoke, e-cigarettes, air pollution), their interactions with genetic and epigenetic variants, and effective interventions for reducing involuntary exposures. She collaborates with major cohort studies such as the Strong Heart Study, a study of cardiovascular disease and its risk factors in American Indian communities, and the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), a study of cardiovascular, metabolic and lung disease in urban settings across the US. Both in the US and internationally, she evaluates exposure to tobacco smoke including emerging public health challenges such as waterpipe smoking and e-cigarettes. Her goals are to contribute to the reduction of environmental health disparities in underserved and disproportionately exposed populations.

Ngai Yin Yip is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Earth and Environmental Engineering at Columbia University. Ngai Yin Yip and his research team are advancing technologies to address challenges at the nexus of water, energy, and the environment. The lab is currently developing new materials and methods for energy efficient desalination, investigating a novel membrane-based technique to harness low-grade heat, and exploring innovative physicochemical strategies for resource recovery from waste streams.

The Moderator:

Alex Halliday is the Founding Dean of the Columbia Climate School and Director of Columbia University’s Earth Institute. He joined the Earth Institute in April 2018, after spending more than a decade at the University of Oxford, during which time he was Dean of Science and Engineering. With about 400 published research papers, Halliday has been a pioneer in developing mass spectrometry to measure small isotopic variations, helping to shed light on the birth and early development of our solar system, the interior workings of the Earth, and the processes that affect Earth’s surface environment.

About Us:

The climate crisis is a challenge like no other. Tackling it requires innovative, coordinated, and transdisciplinary approaches from a top university, like Columbia. The Climate School will marshal the University’s strengths in basic disciplines and expand its resources to understand climate and its impact on society.